Newcastle raises flag to mark 10 years since National Apology to the Stolen Generation

Newcastle raises Aboriginal flag to mark 10 years since National Apology to the Stolen Generation Picture: Max Mason-Hubers
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Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

TweetFacebookTHE Hunter’s Indigenous leaders have praised theNational Apology to the Stolen Generations as an “enormous feat”, while lamentingthe lack of progress in the pastdecade to close the gap.

Newcastle City Council raised the Aboriginalflag in Civic Park on Tuesday to commemoratethe 10thanniversary of former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd apologisingon behalf of the country for the removal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and for government actions thatinflicted suffering.

About 50 people gatheredto hear from Lord Mayor Nuatali Nelmes, Awabakal Local Aboriginal Land Council chief executive Rob Russell and Worimi Local Aboriginal Land Council chief executive Andrew Smith.

Cr Nelmes said February 13 was a date that “must never be forgotten”.

“I don’t think we can underestimatewhat an enormous feat it was by Kevin Rudd to get up in front of all of and all the world to say sorry 10 years ago today,” Mr Russell said.

“Unfortunately… when you look at the lack of achievement by governments–in making reparations for the harm that’s been done,for the outrageous historical trauma that they’ve caused and continue to cause today–they need to give themselves an uppercut and say ‘We could have done much more and we’ve done basically bugger-all except for talk about it’.

“The time for talking was over a long, longtime ago.”

Mr Smith said the apology was a“great step towards real reconciliation” and had“opened eyes to the real history of black ” but hadn’t“delivered on outcomes it was designed to achieve”.

The10th annual Closing the Gap progress report tabled on Mondayshowed onlythree of seven targets were on track.

Mr Russell said he wanted to see an Indigenousvoice in Parliament.

“There’s been some movements forward in terms of education but next is health, housing and employment–they’re inseparable,” he said.

“But if they don’t have an Aboriginal voice helping them it’s just top down government.”

Kamilaroi woman Jamaya Wightman, 22, said it was an “honour” to help raise the flag.

Ms Wightman grew up in Boggabillaand said Indigenous peopleneeded more access to healthcare and education so the next generation, including herone year old daughter Khaleesi, could have a better life.

“Most people don’t have the opportunities to leave small country towns, but I had to leave because there weren’t opportunities back home,” she said.

“In cities there’s good stuff but there’s not much help being put back into small country towns, especially where I’m from.

“I went to a small school and don’t feel my education was what I wish it could have been if I went to school here.I want my daughter to have the opportunities I did not have.”

Apprentice painter and Bundjalung manMark Walker, 20, said the ceremony was an opportunity to “bring everyone together” and catch up with his family.

He said the apology was “recognition after 200 years”.

“It was a big lift and made everyone feel a bit better,” he said.

“A little bit has changed since then but we still have a long way to go. We’re slowly getting there.”

Cr Nelmes said the council had a Reconciliation Action Plan and a 1998 Commitment to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of Newcastle policy.

The city celebrated in August last year the 40thanniversary of former Lord Mayor Joy Cummings’ decision to be the country’s first council to fly the Aboriginal flag from a civic building.

Aust Open explores European co-sanctioning

Jason Day was the main drawcard for November’s n Open at The n Golf Club.Golf (GA) has renewed talks with the European Tour to explore the co-sanctioning of the n Open.
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GA chief executive officer Stephen Pitt held fresh talks with European bosses at the weekend.

“It’s important to look at sanctioning opportunities and look at where we could take the event and what Europe might mean for ,” Pitt told AAP on Tuesday.

“We certainly understand in terms of player pathway that it offers something substantial and that is an important consideration – it’s not the total consideration but it’s something to certainly think about.

“At this stage it’s probably too early to call.

“But the key point is we’re open minded on where we could go and we’re actively looking through what the options might be.”

Finding a suitable date remained a pressing point.

Last year’s n Open was held from November 23-26, a few days after the European Tour’s World Championship event in Dubai.

“There’s always challenges just in terms of dates, that is always a massive challenge,” Pitt said.

“We (the n Open) have clashed with Dubai before and that would obviously be a killer in terms of the European Tour.

“So you’re worried about international events but you’re also worried that you would prefer not to go up against cricket; we clashed with the first Ashes Test last year.

“Long term, you would probably have to work out a way to accommodate them (the European Tour) and I think it could be done.

“It’s just working out how and when that might look.”

Pitt said discussions – also involving Lagardere, the commercial arm of the n Open – would continue.

“There is no direct time frame on it but it’s important to make sure you keep talks moving forward, that is the commitment from here,” he said.

Help farmers in the Upper and Lower Hunter battle the drought

Farmers across the Hunter are battling a crippling drought and they need your help to survive it.
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The Maitland Mercury,Newcastle Herald, Hunter Valley News and The Scone Advocate have joined forces with the charity Rural Aid and its Buy A Bale Campaignto help Hunter farmers as they fight to survive the dry conditions.

In the Upper Hunter the drought is so severe it is the worst in living memory. In the Lower Hunter it is as serious as the 1960s drought that turned farms into dust bowls.

There’s no feed in the paddocks and cattle are going hungry. Hay is scarce, water resources are in short supply and farmers are desperate for help to be able to stay afloat.

Group managing editor Newcastle-Hunter Chad Watson said four Fairfax Media mastheads had united to help make a difference.

Group managing editor Newcastle-Hunter Chad Watson WATER SHORTAGE: Dams on the Stork family property are in crisis. Four out of the five dams are empty.

DROUGHT: Farmer Danny Stork stands on the family property at Glen Oak pondering the landscape. Pictures: Belinda-Jane Davis

DRY TIMES: Brown grass everywhere.

CREEKS ARE DRY: Farmer Danny Stock in the creek bed that should be full of water.

CREEKS ARE DRY: Farmer Danny Stork in another dry creek bed.

DAM: A dam that is almost dry.

DRY TIMES: View of the landscape at Glen Oak.

CREEKS ARE DRY: Another dry creek.

HOPE: Some green grass shoots among the dead grass. They will also die if there is no rain soon.

BROWN GRASS: Farm dogs take a stroll on the grass.

DRY TIMES: View of the landscape.

VEGGIE GARDEN: Pumpkin crop is looking for water.

VEGGIE GARDEN: Pumpkin crop is looking for water.

DRY TIMES: View of the landscape.

DRY TIMES: View of the landscape.

DRY TIMES: View of the landscape.

DRY TIMES: Corn crop looking miserable.

DRY TIMES: View of the landscape.

DRY TIMES: View of the landscape.

DRY TIMES: View of the landscape.

DAM SUPPLY: The water level in the dam has dropped significantly.

DAM SUPPLY: The water level in the dam has dropped significantly.

FOOD SHORTAGE: Cattle at Glen Oak.

FOOD SHORTAGE: Cattle step into the shade to cool down at Glen Oak.

FOOD SHORTAGE: Cattle step into the shade to cool down at Glen Oak.

DRY TIMES: Another dry creek bed.

DRY TIMES: Another dry creek bed.

DRY TIMES: Another dry creek bed.

DRY TIMES: View across the paddock at Glen Oak.

DRY TIMES: View across the paddock at Glen Oak.

DRY TIMES: Dry creek bed.

SHADE: Cattle sitting in the shade.

SHADE: Cattle sitting in the shade.

SHADE: Cattle in the shade.

DRY TIMES: Cattle are being fed with forage to survive.

DRY DAM: A dry dam at Glen Oak.

DRY DAM: A dry dam at Hinton.

WATER SHORTAGE: A dry lagoon between Phoenix Park and Largs.

Ron Campbell at his Merriwa property. Picture: Simon McCarthy

Merriwa, Upper Hunter Valley. Picture: Simon McCarthy

Belltrees, Upper Hunter Valley. Picture: Simon McCarthy

Scone Sale Yards. Picture: Simon McCarthy

Ian McCallum is a fifth generation farmer from Moonan Flat in the Upper Hunter Valley. Picture: Simon McCarthy

Upper Hunter. Picture: Simon McCarthy

Scone Sale Yard. Picture: Simon McCarthy

Scone Sale Yard. Picture: Simon McCarthy

Blandford, Upper Hunter Valley. Picture: Simon McCarthy

Scone Sale Yard. Picture: Simon McCarthy

Scone Sale Yard. Picture: Simon McCarthy

Scone Sale Yard. Picture: Simon McCarthy

Ron Campbell drives around his Merriwa property. Picture: Simon McCarthy

Scone Sale Yard. Picture: Simon McCarthy

Scone Sale Yard. Picture: Simon McCarthy

Scone Sale Yard. Picture: Simon McCarthy

Scone Sale Yards on February 6. Picture: Simone McCarthy

Scone Sale Yards on February 6. Picture: Nick Bielby

Scone Sale Yards on February 6. Picture: Nick Bielby

Scone Sale Yards on February 6. Picture: Nick Bielby

Craig Murphy feeds hay to his stock at his Blandford property. Picture: Nick Bielby

Scone Sale Yards on February 6. Picture: Nick Bielby

Scone Sale Yards on February 6. Picture: Nick Bielby

Scone Sale Yards on February 6. Picture: Nick Bielby

Ian MacCallum with the food required for his stock when there’s little to graze in the paddocks. Picture: Nick Bielby

Many of McCullys Gap’s Lyn Richards’ dams are diminishing, if not completely gone.

Recovering: Bunnan farmer David Wicks was rushed to hospital for heart surgery a few days before Christmas. He has sold his last calves. “It means this time next year I’m going to have no income,” he said. Picture: Simon McCarthy

TweetFacebookWe need the people and companies of the Hunter to get behind our work. We’re asking Hunter residents to help us buy the hay and water we need to supply.

Rural Aid CEO Charles AlderHow can you help?Donate to buy hay, water and groceriesClick here to make a donation that will help buy hay, water and groceries for farmers in need.

Funds raised for groceries will be used to buy gift cards at the farmer’s local supermarket. That way, the money raised in the Hunter will go back into the region’s economy.

Money put towards water will be spent locally while hay will be sourced from outside the Hunter and transported to farmers because ofa lack of supply in the region.

Go shopping for a farmerClick here to stock up on non-perishable food items for farmers –or buy some food for their pets –and take it to one of the drop off points.

Rural Aid will then distribute the items to farmers across the Upper and Lower Hunter.

The drop off points are Baileys of Greta,Melissa Mastin Stylz on Track in Paterson,Pokolbin General Store,Goldmans Produce in Cessnock,Kirkwood Produce Singleton andKirkwood Produce Rutherford.

Want to get involved at work?Pop money in a barrel, or help fill a hay truckTake on the challenge at work and see how far you can go.

Click here to register to receive a donation barrel.

Click here to ordera hay truck poster and gradually fill a load of hay for a farmer.

Businesses can also sponsor a truck load of hay. Sponsorship money will flow into the Hunter account and be put towards supplies.

Click here to sponsor a truck load of hay

Former licensees Samuel Luke and Sean Driver fined $20k following investigation into Soho on Darby Street

Two former Newcastle licensees have been served up fines totalling more than $20,000, after an investigation found their Darby Street restaurant was morphing into a nightclub after dark.
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Samuel Luke and Sean Driver facedNewcastle Local Court last week, following a Liquor & Gaming NSW probe into their restaurant, Soho on Darby.

Mr Luke pleaded guilty to three offences and Mr Driver pleaded guilty to two offences, with all counts relating to selling and supplying liquorcontrary to authority.

EARLIER: Regulator cracks down on Darby Street restaurant

Mr Luke was fined $7500 and ordered to pay $5000 in professional costs, while Mr Driver was fined $3000 and was ordered to pay $5000 in professional costs.

Liquor & Gaming NSWdirector of compliance operationsSean Goodchildsaid the case sent a strong message to the industry that the misuse of a liquor licence would not be tolerated.

“We have investigated a number of recent cases where a venue with a restaurant licence operates as a nightclub or bar,” Mr Goodchildsaid.

“These business models misrepresent their activities and disregard strict obligations under NSW liquor laws, creating a far greater risk of alcohol-related harm.”

The popular Darby Street venue came under scrutiny last year, with Liquor & Gaming NSW carrying out a series of inspections.

They found the lower level of the restaurant empty and the upstairs area full, with 80 to 100 people standing, drinking and dancing in a nightclub-style environment.

In December last year the Independent Liquor & Gaming Authority revokedthe venue’s primary service authorisation, which allows drinks to be served without meals, so long as the venue is operating primarily as a restaurant.

At the time, Soho owner SamLuke told theNewcastle Heraldthe venue was “considering its options moving forward”.

“Soho on Darby is disappointed …especially to the extentthat the decision is based on incidents before the commencement of the current ownership and licensee,” he said.

“Soho has had security patrolling the venue since December 2016 every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from 8pm, when new conditions were put on the licence.

“We have had zero incidents relating to violence or antisocial beahviour since because of the great work our guards and RSA marshals do.”

Vic hospitals to get stab vests and alarms

Victoria’s Health Minister Jill Hennessy says frontline hospital staff are getting safety equipment.Stab-proof vests and duress alarms are being rolled out across Victorian hospitals to try and protect staff from violent patients.
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Health Minister Jill Hennessy on Tuesday announced $7 million in funding would be provided to help keep frontline staff safe from violence in the workplace.

“The unpredictable nature of many patients, particularly those affected by mental health challenges and drug and alcohol issues has meant that for too long and too many instances our healthcare workers have faced occupational violence and aggression,” Ms Hennessy said.

Security staff, doctors and nurses would be equipped with some of the tools including the vests, duress alarms, body cameras, while there will be improved CCTV for hospitals.

The new safety equipment will go to 11 metropolitan health services and 11 regional and rural health services. Of those 14 had provided mental health facilities.

Melbourne’s St Vincent’s hospital would receive the 22 stab-proof vests and more body cameras would be provided at Dandenong Hospital and Monash Medical Centre at Clayton.

“We asked health services to identify their risks and identify what interventions would better address those risks and each health service has been provided with funding according to what their application is,” Ms Hennessay said.

Security staff at Melbourne’s St Vincent’s Hospital will get the vests, aggression prevention co-ordinator Tiffany Plummer said.

A nurse for 30 years, Ms Plummer has been a victim of patient aggression.

“A situation arose that I was at a back of a bed and couldn’t escape because the person jumped out of the bed and blocked the exit, ” she recounted.

“There wasn’t a duress alarm and I did lose my voice so it was frightening.”

The move to protect frontline hospital staff comes amid a court case of a man accused of fatally punching a surgeon outside a Melbourne hospital after the alleged agressor was asked to stop smoking.

National domestic violence helpline: 1800 737 732 or 1800RESPECT. In an emergency call triple-zero.

Surfest: Jackson Baker spearheading local hopes with winning new formula

ON POINT: Merewether natural-footer Jackson Baker ripping at the Great Lakes Pro last week. Picture: WSL/Ethan SmithJackson Baker admits getting caught up in the raw emotion of competing at home during difficult times over the past two years.
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Now the 21-year-old hopes a new approach to surfing at Merewether, and an already successful formula for 2018, will change his fortunes at the Burton Automotive Pro 6000-point qualifying series contest, starting Monday.

Surfing to honour his mum, Tracy, who died in August 2016,Baker won his first-ever heat at the contest last year but bowed out in his next.AtSurfest 2016, Merewether Surfboard Club were in mourning after the passing of life member Garry Callinan, the father of professional surfer Ryan Callinan.

“With everything that has happened personally and in the Merewether community,a lot of us, especially myself, are pretty emotional about surfing at our local break and doing those people proud, especially my Mum,” Baker said.“And I got caught up in that the past couple of years, getting too emotional with it.

“Now I canfind a balance of, I want to do her proud and that’s all I can do. It’s not the be all and end all. She would be happy with me no matter what. It’sjust live life and make her happy and proud.

“I want to just go into Surfest and have that home-town feeling but not use it as havingpressure. It’s just a bonus havingan event at home.”

Baker, 2016 championship tour surfer Callinan and 2009 women’s champion Philippa Anderson will again carry local hopes in Surfest’s main events. Wildcard Madison Poole, 17, will start in the women’s round of 48 against world No.1 Tyler Wright.

Anderson and Michelle Donoghue are the only Newcastle surfers to claim the top events. Callinan has challenged, making the quarter-finals in 2016 and round of 16 in 2017. He will start in the round of 96 next week as a wildcard after a limited 2017 QS campaign.

Baker, though, will start in the round of 144 as the Hunter’s in-form hope afterwins at the 1000-point Tweed Coast and Great Lakes pros this month.He believed the victories had eased the pressure heading into Surfest.

“My aim is to get a good result, but it’sjust more about keeping the ball rolling from those two wins and keep the confidence going,” he said.“It’s the first year I’ve come into these events with results and the pressure is kind of off almost becauseI’ve already had two good results.”

He said sacrifices, like a carb-free diet and cutback on beers,this year had already made a difference.

“Usually things like that don’t pay off so quick but two wins, straight off the bat, I feel like I’m surfing better than I ever had. Things are looking up.”

Clubmate Anderson, the No.18 women’s seed, trains withBaker at Trypas Athletic.

“We all work so hard so it’s really cool to see when it pays off,” she said.“I’m super stokedfor him and hopefully he can carry that into Surfest and Ryan can do well.

“I’ve only had two events so far, a ninth and a third and personally I’m not very happy with it, but the boards are feeling good, so hopefully I can get a good result here.”

Baker hoped conditions at Merewether would give locals an edge this year.

“We’ve never had waves, that I know of, that have been an advantage at Merewether for us,” Baker said.

“It’s got to come sooner or later. If it’s good Merewether, then you’ll see me, Ryan and Philippa have that little home advantage of knowing where to sit and position ourselves. The last couple of years it’s been down at Dixon Park, and that’s like you’re rocking up to any beach in the world almost.”

Baker meets Mitch Parkinson,Gatien DelahayeandElijah Gates in the round of 144.

Anderson starts in a four-woman heat featuring Silvana Lima, whileCallinan has Kanoa Igarashi in his first heat.

OpinionHow philosophers help us live better

SMART MOVE: Boot camps for the mind? Now there’s an idea. My daily dawdle along the beach includes random unpleasant encounters with lithe, rippling bodies in ‘licensed’designer sportswear, an affront to my flaccid muscles, my footy shorts and ragged t-shirt. For many, these days, everything seems to depend on physical beauty, or so they believe.Water-front boot camps promote muscle tone and the body beautiful, and the gym is today’s cathedral, with gym instructors barking shrill orders and promises of tighter butts, washboard bellies, and more defined biceps.
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Ads, movie stars, images of the perfect body, all conspire to make us both uncomfortable in our own skin, and aspiring for an ideal that probably doesn’t exist. Some feminists and doctors have suggested that the super-thin models featured in magazines promote eating disorders. The pressure on young women to conform to these imaginary standards is immense.

This relentless drive to perfection even affects skin colour. Japanese women buy skin-whitening creams, while other womenare buying browning lotions. In China, a surgeon can lengthen stubby legs by cracking thefemur and stretching it. Hair can be straightened, curled, coloured or depilated.

Studies have even found correlations between beauty and better exam marks, higher paid jobs, enduring relationships, success at obtaining home loans and, incredibly, shorter prison sentences. So our prisons should be full of ugly, academically-slow, divorced renters. It seems that we judge each other on the very superficial level of physical appearance.

We can’t air-brush life and make everyone ‘gorgeous’, but there are some promising signs of a feminist fight-back. Suzanne Collins, in The Hunger Games, proclaimed “I am not pretty. I am not beautiful. I am as radiant as the sun.” Magazines are beginning to look for models who look more like your aunty, and in my circle of friends, the success of a post-Christmas diet is indicated by a “space-saver” where once a full-size spare existed around the middle.

Just how did we end up with such impossibly idealised versions of what it means to be beautiful? Or as Woody Allen so cleverly argued against skin-deep beauty, “who wants to have a beautiful pancreas?”

It goesback to the classics. Think of the statues you studied in art classes at school. The ancient Greeks had definite ideas about physical beauty – symmetry, conformity to the norm, proportion, etc – which we have appropriated in a very shallow way. For far more important to the ancients was the idea of the beautiful life, achieved through a balanced mind and body, in harmony, both constantly developing. Greek youth were as likely to be found in the agora, arguing philosophy, as in the gym. Indeed Greek mythology warns us strongly against any preoccupation with our own beauty, which can lead only to the sort of nasty, watery end endured by Narcissus.

And while the Greeks had no exact synonym for “beauty”, they did have a definite concept of “beautiful life”, which went way deeper than musculature. Just as they had seven types of ‘love’from Eros (erotic love) to Agape (altruistic), Greek ‘beauty’was nuanced and sophisticated, and involved constant self-questioning and examination.

They were not just preoccupiedwith appearance and the superficial. Artists depict Socrates as a ‘buff’man. We need to heed his advice, and remember our complexity, and the need to develop both body and mind. We need boot camps for the mind.

John Beach, Cooks Hill

Hockey: Tokyo 2020 Olympics now the aim for Mariah Williams after being ruled out of 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games

OUT: Hockeyroos striker Mariah Williams won’t contest the 2018 Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast in April after recently undergoing surgery. The 22-year-old will now aim for the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo. Picture: Josh CallinanHOCKEYROOS striker Mariah Williams has reset her sights on the 2020 Olympics afterher dream to contest a home Commonwealth Games was shattered by surgery.
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Tokyo becomes the next major goal for the 22-year-old former Hunter Sports High School studentwith April’s international multi-sports festival on the Gold Coast now out of the question.

Williams, whose parents live at Teralba, underwent a procedure recently to lengthen her adductor tendon and clean out her pubic symphysis and it’s set to keep her sidelined for six months.

The 2016 national under-21 captain and Rio Olympian posted a photograph on social media this week showing her smiling but wheelchair-bound at an n coastal location.

@mariahwilliams24“Extremely happy to be out of surgery and ready for the next 6 months of rehabbing back on the East Coast at the AIS,” Perth-based Williams wrote in an accompanying message.

“But unfortunately my injury puts me out of a home Commonwealth Games which is shattering but Tokyo 2020 Olympics is the big goal.”

Parkes-raised Williams has already had four lots of knee surgery with her latest two years ago almost ruling out an Olympic debut.

Since playing her first senior international game in 2013 Williams, who links with Newcastle women’s club Souths, hasseven goals from 63 appearances.

On the weekend the Hockeyroos wrapped up two Test series in Perth with a fourth win from nine matches against China and Spain.

“We’ve still got a fair way to go before Comm Games,” coach Paul Gaudoin told Hockey media.

“Getting international matches is really important for our progression to test ourselves and to know where we sit.

“We go away from this knowing the areas we need to work on and to really home in for six to seven weeks later.”

Meanwhile, Norths defender and Rio Olympian Matthew Dawson was on Tuesday named in the 18-manKookaburras squad for the Azlan Shah Cup being played in Malaysia from March 3 to 10.

Mariah Williams

Vocal Holmes wants Sharks’ No.1 spot

Cronulla’s Valentine Holmes desires to play fullback for club, state and country.NRL star Valentine Holmes plans to be a more vocal presence for the Sharks at fullback, a position he ultimately aspires to fill for Queensland and .
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Holmes had a record run in the Kangaroos’ victorious World Cup campaign last year, scoring five tries against Samoa and six against Fiji from the wing, while Billy Slater lined up at fullback.

While he played virtually all last NRL season for Cronulla at No.1, almost all Holmes’s representative games for Queensland and have been on the wing.

Highly credentialled Sharks recruits Josh Dugan and Matt Moylan can also play fullback but 22-year-old Holmes is tipped to get first crack there in 2018.

“It’s definitely a position I’ve always strived to play. My idols were always fullbacks,” Holmes told AAP.

“It’s definitely a good position I’d like to see myself playing in the future.”

Asked about aspirations to play there for the Maroons and Kangaroos, Holmes said: “Definitely one day.

“I’m still a bit young now. I’ve still got a lot to learn and a lot more experience to get under my belt.”

Despite his relative youth, Holmes is ready to assert himself in the Sharks’ No.1 jersey.

“I want to try being more vocal on the team, try and help lead the boys around the halves,” he said.

With James Maloney moving to Penrith, Holmes is one of the candidates to take over the Sharks goal-kicking duties.

He said Moylan and Chad Townsend had been among those practising their kicking during the pre-season.

Cronulla have undergone plenty of personnel changes since last year, with Dugan and Moylan among several newcomers, while the losses include Maloney, Jack Bird, Gerard Beale and Chris Heighington.

“Obviously we had a few big losses, we’ve lost a few good players and gained some along the way,” Holmes said.

“All the boys have trained well throughout the pre-season and we’ve got a game this weekend against Manly. I’m looking forward to see how everyone goes.”

Warners Bay post office inquest day two: Stephen Hodge shot four times after lunging at police with large knife

Police were not carrying tasers when they confronted Stephen Hodge FOOTAGE: A CCTV still of Stephen Hodge, armed with a large knife, as he chases his boss, Brendan Hogan, out onto the street. Mr Hodge was later shot dead by two police officers when he advanced on them. Picture: Supplied
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FOOTAGE: A CCTV still of Stephen Hodge, armed with a large knife, as he chases his boss, Brendan Hogan, out onto the street. Picture: Supplied

FOOTAGE: A CCTV still of Stephen Hodge, armed with a large knife, as he chases his boss, Brendan Hogan, out onto the street. Picture: Supplied

FOOTAGE: A CCTV still of Stephen Hodge, armed with a large knife, as he chases his boss, Brendan Hogan, out onto the street. Picture: Supplied

FOOTAGE: A CCTV still of Stephen Hodge, armed with a large knife, as he chases his boss, Brendan Hogan, out onto the street. Picture: Supplied

FOOTAGE: A CCTV still of Stephen Hodge, armed with a large knife, as he chases his boss, Brendan Hogan, out onto the street. Picture: Supplied

FOOTAGE: A CCTV still of Stephen Hodge, armed with a large knife, as he chases his boss, Brendan Hogan, out onto the street. Picture: Supplied

The fatal confrontation between police and Stephen Hodge in the car park of Warners Bay post office.

The fatal confrontation between police and Stephen Hodge in the car park of Warners Bay post office.

The fatal confrontation between police and Stephen Hodge in the car park of Warners Bay post office.

The fatal confrontation between police and Stephen Hodge in the car park of Warners Bay post office.

TweetFacebookPolice were not carrying tasers when they confronted Stephen Hodgehttps://nnimgt-a.akamaihd苏州夜场招聘/transform/v1/crop/frm/v6ZqFubQfSczSV22Th78nc/2135081f-fbe2-4a03-8381-5ea3bfd0572a.JPG/r0_44_1800_1061_w1200_h678_fmax.jpgThe detail, which may provide some explanation or insight into the tactical response taken by the two Lake Macquarie constables, came during the inquest on Tuesday.news, local-news, steve hodge, postal worker, australia post, warners bay, post office, police shooting2018-02-13T17:00:00+11:00https://players.brightcove苏州夜场招聘/3879528182001/default_default/index.html?videoId=5732347263001https://players.brightcove苏州夜场招聘/3879528182001/default_default/index.html?videoId=5732347263001″I always had feelings that maybe one day something might go awry,” Warners Bay postmaster Brendan Hogan said in reply toquestions about whether he was scared of Mr Hodge or feared one day Mr Hodge would harm him.

Mr Hodge had been sent home on the day of the shootingafter he disappeared from work and then become aggressive with Mr Hogan.But he re-emerged at the rear of the post office a short time later armed with a large kitchen knife.

Mr Hogan detailed on Tuesday the terrifying moments when Mr Hodge advanced on him from the counter area of the post office with the large knife raised at head height.

“I kept talking to Steve asking him to put the knife down,” Mr Hogan said.

“He didn’tsay anything. From the time I first saw him to the time he was chasing me he never said a single word.”

The inquest wasalso shown a 20-minute compilation video of CCTV and mobile phone footage stitched together to show the final hours and minutes in the postal worker’s life.

The video concludes before the officers fire the fatal shots and includes audio from one witness asking why the police don’t deploy tasers to subdue Mr Hodge.

It’s often the first question asked by the public after a police shooting, but one of the officers involved, constable Darren Hamilton explained that he and Jamie Taylor were attached to the special operations group and wearing plainclothes on the day of the shooting.

“There is no plainclothes tasers,” now senior constable Hamilton said.

“Usually with firearms youkeep them concealed under your shirt. “But there is nowhere to hide the taser under your shirt.”

The week-long coronial inquest will explore a number of issues relating to Mr Hodge’s death, including the significance of the fact that one officer became trapped behind a gate before Mr Hodge was shot and whether a change in managing Mr Hodge’s behaviour and performanceby Post contributed to his erratic behaviour on the day he died.